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Nature at Home: Longleaf pine

Nature at Home: Longleaf pine

Longleaf pine was once the dominate tree in the Southeast. It is estimated that it occupied 90 million acres. Now due to harvesting, conversion of much of this land to other uses, and the restriction of wildfires, it only occupies 3 percent of its original range.
Chronology of longleaf pine restoration on a North Florida site

Chronology of longleaf pine restoration on a North Florida site

Land owned by St. Joe Paper Company (St. Joe Company, until 1966) was planted in slash pine.
Nature at Home: Thank a Native Bee

Nature at Home: Thank a Native Bee

We can thank pollinators for much of the food we eat. In fact, about 80% of our plants and crops are pollinated by insects. We know and love our butterflies and moths as pollinators and often help them by creating welcoming habitats in garden spaces large and small. Did you know that bees and wasps are much more efficient pollinators? They do much of the heavy lifting of pollinating plants, especially food crops.
Nature at Home: Making a home for a beautiful little bird!

Nature at Home: Making a home for a beautiful little bird!

Bluebirds, seven inches in length fully grown, have a blue back and head and yellow-brown and white chest and belly. They live in meadows, open woods, parklands, and even in neighborhoods with tall trees and some lawns with borders of large shrubs. They build nests in cavities such as holes in trees, fence posts or well-designed nest boxes where the female lays four to six pale blue eggs. When nesting, they become very territorial and are known to dive bomb cats to drive them away from the nest. Bluebirds thrive on a diet of caterpillars and insects and will also eat berries if available.
Nature at Home: Florida’s Native Habitats and Species

Nature at Home: Florida’s Native Habitats and Species

Wetlands provide many important functions. They store and filter our water, provide wildlife habitat and, in more urban places, provide needed greenspace. Whether you explore our wetlands from their edges or a boardwalk, during the humid summer or on dry, cool winter days, you will find that they host their own special community of plants and animals. Stan Rosenthal, Forest Advocate for the Florida Wildlife Federation, takes you on a tour to see some interesting plants that you might see in a forested wetland.
Nature at Home: Small Space Gardening

Nature at Home: Small Space Gardening

Growing in containers or very small garden plots is a good way to try out gardening with just a little commitment, or to nourish an existing love of growing things if you only have a small space available. Place containers with your favorite veggies and herbs right outside the door or on the patio and you are gardening!
Nature at Home: Marvelous Moth

Nature at Home: Marvelous Moth

Wonderful pictures of a newly emerged giant silk moth called Polyphemus, Antheraea polyphemus, were recently shared with me. Hanging with its wings folded, the moth’s size and antennae are noticeable features. Its wingspan is 4-6 inches and the comb-like antennae are sensitive to smell, useful for finding food or mates, and possibly navigation. Polyphemus has eye spots on all 4 wings, with two distinctive spots said to mimic the eyes of a larger animal – maybe even a Great Horned Owl. That should be enough to scare off a host of predators!
Nature at Home: Garden Photography

Nature at Home: Garden Photography

This spring, as we continue social distancing and staying at home as much as possible, many people are writing about the pleasure they’re finding in gardening. Some are life-long gardeners, others are finding connection to nature in planting seeds for the first time.
Nature at Home for Kids Indoors

Nature at Home for Kids Indoors

As we try to stay safe at home, many families are looking for interesting and educational activities for kids. Even on days when we can get out to walk or play close to home there are still hours spent inside.
Nature at Home: Sunflowers

Nature at Home: Sunflowers

As many of us are staying home during the COVID-19 pandemic, it may give us a chance to enjoy the natural world close at hand. The first bloom on a sunflower is a welcome sign of spring. Last week in our garden this mighty sunflower, already over 6 feet tall, produced its first flower.